NBN

The NBN rollout is several years into the project; a recently released report from the ACCC has given insights into the wholesale market and initial market indicators show that the market is becoming less competitive. This paper examines the costs of interconnecting with the NBN and demonstrates why the NBN has not achieved its goal of providing a level playing field for all telecommunication companies. By looking at the true cost of providing NBN services to NBN users, it is shown that the NBN pricing model is flawed and will affect the quality of service being provided to Australians. 

This paper analyses the value of FTTN and FTTP along financial and non-financial dimensions. It reports on an open, public, dynamic ?value model? of FTTN and FTTP, and showcases two visual tools to enable assessment of their multiple, competing, emerging and slippery ?value dimensions?. The paper reports and compares empirically-derived FTTN and FTTP value dimensions from recent Ministerial Speeches at CommsDay Summit 2016 and Government expert reports with the value model. 

On 22 June 2016, Mike Quigley, the founding CEO of NBN Co, gave an address to TelSoc on his insights into, and predictions for, the Australian National Broadband Network (NBN).  This article provides a brief summary of his presentation and a commentary on some of the issues raised. 

This paper addresses the limitations of the Australian government's new NBN policy (11 December 2014) and proposes some changes in approach which share the objectives of the policy but without compromising access speed. The changes will eliminate the lead-in cost entirely and will introduce infrastructure competition in the long-term interests of end-users. They will accelerate the NBN roll-out and ensure that the national infrastructure is responsive to future technologies, market demands and business opportunities.

In this paper we outline a number of matters that have been raised in relation to Deep-fibre Fibre-to-the-Distribution-Point (FTTdp), and address practical ways that FTTdp can be expected to deliver a maximum overall cost-benefit outcome for the Australian NBN. We conclude that FTTdp must be honestly evaluated if the nation is to achieve a maximal NBN capability outcome.

Australia?s fixed broadband services performance and takeup is continuing to fall behind other comparable countries in international benchmarks. Indecision about the structure of Australia?s broadband market is likely to continue to retard medium to long term investment in the fibre infrastructure needed to improve Australia?s broadband rankings against its international peers.

With the optimistic air of change that has come from a new Prime Minister, this is the time to look at a realistic option for the NBN which accepts on-budget expenditure, establishes a future-proof approach and provides the opportunity for those who want it to pay a realistic amount towards getting connected. Governments build roads, not driveways. So why should we assume anyone building a national telecommunications network should worry about connecting right up to the front door, especially for those who don?t want it.

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