NBN Policy

The Australian Multi-Technology Mix (MTM) NBN plan includes Fibre to the Node technology and remediating and upgrading the existing Telstra and Optus Hybrid Fibre Coaxial networks. This paper discusses the migration from the MTM NBN to a Fibre to the Curb or ubiquitous Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) NBN.

Australia’s politics, insular policies and categorisation of fixed telecommunications as a natural monopoly have made Australia a global laggard in the provision of broadband services. The return of government ownership of telecoms infrastructure in the form of the National Broadband Network and the continuing lack of investment in fibre infrastructure highlight the political and policy failures.

This paper addresses the limitations of the Australian government's new NBN policy (11 December 2014) and proposes some changes in approach which share the objectives of the policy but without compromising access speed. The changes will eliminate the lead-in cost entirely and will introduce infrastructure competition in the long-term interests of end-users. They will accelerate the NBN roll-out and ensure that the national infrastructure is responsive to future technologies, market demands and business opportunities.

In this paper we outline a number of matters that have been raised in relation to Deep-fibre Fibre-to-the-Distribution-Point (FTTdp), and address practical ways that FTTdp can be expected to deliver a maximum overall cost-benefit outcome for the Australian NBN. We conclude that FTTdp must be honestly evaluated if the nation is to achieve a maximal NBN capability outcome.

Australia?s fixed broadband services performance and takeup is continuing to fall behind other comparable countries in international benchmarks. Indecision about the structure of Australia?s broadband market is likely to continue to retard medium to long term investment in the fibre infrastructure needed to improve Australia?s broadband rankings against its international peers.

This paper describes how hybrid fibre coaxial networks can provide all the required features of the Australian National Broadband Network (NBN) and the potential upgrade path to a future all-fibre access network.

24 high-level representatives were interviewed from across Australian society and industry to explore (a) what changes might occur in each sector once next generation broadband (NGB) is widely available and (b) what action is needed to prepare for these changes.

Developing the best NBN strategy for Australia needs to take cost into consideration, and this article asserts that there is scope for NBN Co to improve its performance in this area. The article argues that FTTN/DSL solutions can deliver good quality broadband, and that the current HFC access netwokrs in Australia can be upgraded to provide next-generation speeds.

This paper provides a flexible upgrade path for the Australian National Broadband Network (NBN), given that the new federal government has a policy of altering the construction methodology to introduce a copper-based access system such as Fibre to the Node (FTTN). The operational advantages of eliminating FTTN cabinets by use of FTTS (Fibre to the Street) technology are spelled out.

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